Just a freckly girl livin' in a fish world.

Just a freckly girl livin' in a fish world.


Kelsi M. Rutledge, M.S.c.

PhD Student and Researcher at UCLA

Click here for CV

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Kelsi M. Rutledge, M.S.c.

PhD Student and Researcher at UCLA

Click here for CV

about me

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Kelsi Rutledge is a PhD student who aims to work at the intersection of biology and physics/engineering. Her previous research includes understanding the development and shell-crushing ability of stingray jaws, which was covered by Forbes, here. She also described a new species of fish and was featured on Spectrum News. Her current research focuses on the fluid dynamics of chemoreception in fishes. She is broadly interested in functional morphology (how shape influences function), sensory biology, and how the study of such systems can lead to bioinspired design.


Kelsi Rutledge received her B.S.c. in Marine Biology and Environmental Science with Honors at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington. She then switched coasts and obtained her M.S.c. in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA). She is currently a second year PhD student at UCLA.

Why study FishES?

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As you sit on your towel at the beach, letting the tide tickle your toes, you probably aren't thinking about all the critters in those deep blue waters- actually, you probably actively try to avoid thinking about that. And while you may not always see them, they are there (at least ~33,000 species of fishes) and many have been there for millions of years- evolving to the somewhat harsh underwater conditions Ariel so desperately fought to flee. However, fishes are remarkably resilient in many ways, my professor once said "if there's water, there's likely a fish." From the fiery, hot waters under volcanoes to the icy waters of the Antarctic, there's some poor fish swimming around. These different environments and habitats have led to the incredible diversity of our finned-friends, In fact, they are the most species-rich vertebrate (sorry mammals). This diversity in form and function is what I find so interesting, and provides countless research rabbit-holes to fall down. The field I have fallen into is called "functional morphology" which is a broad term that essentially means I get to ask questions like "why does it look that way?" and "what's that for?" You know- very technical stuff. But at the end of the day, it's these simple questions that prove to be challenging and often require cross-disciplinary answers. My research aims to look at fishes through the lens of an engineer with possible applications for new, bioinspired technology. So, become a "part of my world" and join me in my journey of trying to understand our evolutionary ancestor: the fish.